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 Cold paws 
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Post Cold paws
This is my first season hunting from a boat, and first season with a dog. We live in Michigan and my dog is already complaining about cold paws. It's not that cold yet. This morning it was 45 degrees, and about an hour into the hunt he was lifting his paws up off the hunt deck and shaking. How is he going to handle it when it actually gets cold?

What do you guys do?


Sat Oct 20, 2018 12:08 pm
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Post Re: Cold paws
Being from south Louisiana, we don't get cold like y'all do up there, but this past year we had some mornings where it was in the 20s and wet. I got my pup a neoprene vest that helps a lot with core temp (believed I paid 50 for it at Cabelas), and I keep a couple of towels in the boat. After retrieves, I pat her down if she is in the boat and dry her feet off and ears. If you are hunting out of a boat, get you some hydroturf on the floor where your pup sits. It doesn't hold heat or cold much and helps a lot with their paws. Lastly, for super cold mornings, we have a couple butane heaters that we keep in the boat and I put one by my dog if I see she is cold. Hope this all helps bud

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Post Re: Cold paws
I have a momarsh Invisilab that I fold the legs under like a ground blind and put it on the front deck of the boat. It drains water quickly and I just put a little camo burlap or brush on it. Dog hunts off the front of the boat.

It may not produce those MMT photo of the month pics of the dog next to your engine, but it keeps the dog warm, gives him a defined place to be (which makes it less likely to break), and takes no time to set up. Never had an issue even in single digits with ice.


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Sat Oct 20, 2018 5:26 pm
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Post Re: Cold paws
You can also get some mushers salve to toughen up their feet.


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Sat Oct 20, 2018 5:33 pm
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Post Re: Cold paws
Wchauvin wrote:
Being from south Louisiana, we don't get cold like y'all do up there, but this past year we had some mornings where it was in the 20s and wet. I got my pup a neoprene vest that helps a lot with core temp (believed I paid 50 for it at Cabelas), and I keep a couple of towels in the boat. After retrieves, I pat her down if she is in the boat and dry her feet off and ears. If you are hunting out of a boat, get you some hydroturf on the floor where your pup sits. It doesn't hold heat or cold much and helps a lot with their paws. Lastly, for super cold mornings, we have a couple butane heaters that we keep in the boat and I put one by my dog if I see she is cold. Hope this all helps bud

I think I will get him a vest this year. I didn't think he would need it, at least not this early. But perhaps he's not as tough as he acts. Hydro-Turf is what I was thinking for his feet. I am definitely going to put it on there for him next season. I think this season I have a piece of floor mat, the kind with the holes in it, then I will see if that works for now.


Sun Oct 21, 2018 6:38 am
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Post Re: Cold paws
That should serve the same purpose bro. What I usually do is put it on her if it is 40 or under, other than that, she is good I find

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Sun Oct 21, 2018 12:54 pm
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Post Re: Cold paws
Saw this in one of my upland dog magazines. We don't have the cold paw problem in South florida.Image

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Tue Oct 23, 2018 9:09 am
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Post Re: Cold paws
ibfishinb wrote:
Saw this in one of my upland dog magazines. We don't have the cold paw problem in South florida.Image

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I am interested in trying it. I'm wondering if anybody else has tried it. I imagine it would be great for when things get icy. I just wonder how hard is it to clean off afterwards. My dog is a working dog but also hangs out in the house when he's off the job.


Tue Oct 23, 2018 9:50 am
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Post Re: Cold paws
Neoprene vest is a must. It not only keeps their entire body warm, it provides floatation and keeps them from shaking off and spraying everything in the boat. I use the 3mm size early season (unless over 60 degrees) and 5mm size late season.

This last week I hunted with air temp in the mid-20's and windchill in the low teens. He had his vest on and then I'd use the SUGAR coat ( http://thesugarcoat.com/) over that for times when he started shivering. Just like with humans, if you keep the core body temp up, the extremities will stay warmer.

Hydroturf in the boat also helps a ton to prevent heat conduction thru the aluminum and into the cold water.

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Wed Oct 24, 2018 5:34 am
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Post Re: Cold paws
MNGunner wrote:
Neoprene vest is a must. It not only keeps their entire body warm, it provides floatation and keeps them from shaking off and spraying everything in the boat. I use the 3mm size early season (unless over 60 degrees) and 5mm size late season.

This last week I hunted with air temp in the mid-20's and windchill in the low teens. He had his vest on and then I'd use the SUGAR coat ( http://thesugarcoat.com/) over that for times when he started shivering. Just like with humans, if you keep the core body temp up, the extremities will stay warmer.

Hydroturf in the boat also helps a ton to prevent heat conduction thru the aluminum and into the cold water.


Thanks. That is helpful. I did order him a vest that showed up yesterday. It was an extra large. I had to order another one. I guess his fat ass needs a XXL. I didn't even think about the fact he won't be able to shake water everywhere. That'll be nice because most of the places we hunt are very Mucky.


Wed Oct 24, 2018 5:45 am
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Post Re: Cold paws
So, I've read a couple horror stories about healthy, "tough" dogs and hypothermia. I think theres omw ot a link to one lurking in the threads on mmt. Not even something to play with. The word tough has nothing to do with this discussion. Vest below 50 or 60, foot protection and some sort of effort to keep em warm below 35 or so. It's not much trouble, and doesnt have anything to do with toughness in your dog. He has no control over heat loss in his body, and it's just too easy to help him/her. Every dog is different, and most will be fine colder, but why push it? Get whatever they need to be comfortable while they wait on you to miss the next bird lol

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Wed Oct 24, 2018 6:58 am
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Post Re: Cold paws
Russ wrote:
So, I've read a couple horror stories about healthy, "tough" dogs and hypothermia. I think theres omw ot a link to one lurking in the threads on mmt. Not even something to play with. The word tough has nothing to do with this discussion. Vest below 50 or 60, foot protection and some sort of effort to keep em warm below 35 or so. It's not much trouble, and doesnt have anything to do with toughness in your dog. He has no control over heat loss in his body, and it's just too easy to help him/her. Every dog is different, and most will be fine colder, but why push it? Get whatever they need to be comfortable while they wait on you to miss the next bird lol

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In regards to hypothermia, biggest two things I’ve found is bringing a towel and quick drying the dog off when they get out of the water to at least get the big water off, and to give them a wind blocked place to be that also drains water well.

When I used to hunt big water and salt marshes on the mid Atlantic coast, it would get really cold, harsh winds, etc. My dog never had an issue because he would get out of the water, get wiped off fast, and then get into his invisilab on the front of the boat that would keep him out of the wind and drained water fast. I’m a big supporter of momarsh’s invisilab as you can tell. I’ve had one for 5 years in salt, etc and it’s still going strong. It’s definitely one of the best and most versatile pieces of hunting gear I have.

As an aside, I don’t really believe the neoprene vests do much. I use one on my dog in timber and areas with submerged hazards, but in terms of warmth, they have to be tailored well to really do much. Just drying them off tends to do at least as much and only costs $5 for a dark colored Walmart towel.


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Wed Oct 24, 2018 8:37 am
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Post Re: Cold paws
$7. Tariffs, dude.

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Wed Oct 24, 2018 9:18 am
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Post Re: Cold paws
Russ wrote:
So, I've read a couple horror stories about healthy, "tough" dogs and hypothermia. I think theres omw ot a link to one lurking in the threads on mmt. Not even something to play with. The word tough has nothing to do with this discussion. Vest below 50 or 60, foot protection and some sort of effort to keep em warm below 35 or so. It's not much trouble, and doesnt have anything to do with toughness in your dog. He has no control over heat loss in his body, and it's just too easy to help him/her. Every dog is different, and most will be fine colder, but why push it? Get whatever they need to be comfortable while they wait on you to miss the next bird lol

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#TheGhostBoat
#whoneedsphysicsihaveamudmotor


I agree... why push it... that's why I'm looking to see what you guys are doing. Saturday morning he will be wearing his new fest, and his paws will not be directly on the deck. I have a piece of material that drains quickly and should not draw the heat from his paws.

We will see how that helps.


Wed Oct 24, 2018 10:57 am
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Post Re: Cold paws
I used to live on the gulf coast and one year, opening day, my dog and I had traveled several hours north across a strong cold front (want to say it was 2015). We had not seen temps below 60 degrees, even at night on the coast yet that fall and she was still relatively young at two years old. The temp opening morning was 30 degrees with a brisk wind. I took an old jacket, tied it as high up on the tree as I could and wrapped her up in it after she made her first retrieve and got wet. It was funny after that because every time I’d send her for a retrieve, she’d bust out of the jacket and a cloud of steam would follow. I caught some flak from my hunting buddies for it but I didn’t care, she stayed warm. Hypothermia is nothing to play around with. A guy I know who lives in Florida but was up near us hunting nearly had his dog die that morning from getting too cold.

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Wed Oct 24, 2018 3:02 pm
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Post Re: Cold paws
Our dogs down in South Florida are definitely more acclimated to survive the surface of the sun than sub 30 air temps and water temps in the 50s. It would be tough. Hell... I fell out one year in Arkansas after I took my gloves off for a little while. I can't shoot with gloves on and took them off for a while in single digit temps. It was sub zero earlier that morning. Needless to say I don't function well at all in cold weather and succumbed to heat loss through my hands of all places.

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Wed Oct 24, 2018 7:12 pm
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Post Re: Cold paws
ibfishinb wrote:
Our dogs down in South Florida are definitely more acclimated to survive the surface of the sun than sub 30 air temps and water temps in the 50s. It would be tough. Hell... I fell out one year in Arkansas after I took my gloves off for a little while. I can't shoot with gloves on and took them off for a while in single digit temps. It was sub zero earlier that morning. Needless to say I don't function well at all in cold weather and succumbed to heat loss through my hands of all places.

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You should try Musher's Secret on your hands. :lol:


Wed Oct 24, 2018 7:28 pm
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Post Re: Cold paws
Russ wrote:

As an aside, I don’t really believe the neoprene vests do much. I use one on my dog in timber and areas with submerged hazards, but in terms of warmth, they have to be tailored well to really do much. Just drying them off tends to do at least as much and only costs $5 for a dark colored Walmart towel.



Tailoring definitely will make them more effective but they do way more than you think. Stick your hand under their vest and you'd be surprised how much warmer it is.

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Post Cold paws
MNGunner wrote:
Russ wrote:

As an aside, I don’t really believe the neoprene vests do much. I use one on my dog in timber and areas with submerged hazards, but in terms of warmth, they have to be tailored well to really do much. Just drying them off tends to do at least as much and only costs $5 for a dark colored Walmart towel.



Tailoring definitely will make them more effective but they do way more than you think. Stick your hand under their vest and you'd be surprised how much warmer it is.


I have, nothing special. Dry your dog off and it’s the same. I just don’t get the dog best craze for anything other than protecting them from sticks, and cool looking cabelas adds. I’ve used many different kinds, I’ve tried tailoring, etc on all the vests my dogs have tried. Minimal difference, not works the effort, and the only thing that’s ever made a difference to my dog is a wipe from a towel and a wind blocked dry place (aka invisilab).

I use them for timber or nasty spots to prevent impaling on a stick, that’s it now.


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Wed Oct 24, 2018 8:24 pm
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Post Re: Cold paws
My dogs vest keeps her wayyyyyy warmer than without it. She also gets dried off and sits behind full cover, but that vest definitely keeps them warm. Like ol boy said above, when you stick your hand in that vest, it's warm

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Post Cold paws
Wchauvin wrote:
My dogs vest keeps her wayyyyyy warmer than without it. She also gets dried off and sits behind full cover, but that vest definitely keeps them warm. Like ol boy said above, when you stick your hand in that vest, it's warm


Show me a study or something that isolated the variables and tells me which is most effective. I have put my hand inside the vest, and found it no different than the dogs coat when dry. Everyone always speaks to these issues purely anecdotally.

From everything I’ve seen and the numerous vests I have tried, tailored, etc, drying a dog off at least as much as a vest, and costs on $7 now with the Chinese tariffs. The vast majority of vests prior to tailoring act as a water scoop anyways and arguments have been made that a standard vest, especially prior to tailoring, actually pulls more heat from the dogs body. To make neoprene even remotely effective you need precise tailoring.

The dogs DRY hair and blocking the wind is far more effective, so just bring a towel. May not be as cool for facejob or instagram pics, but it works well. I just don’t care to complicate it. Just make sure you don’t use oil removing dog shampoo during the season so the dogs hair stays oily and keeps water out of the undercoat.

If you want a dog vest, get a dog vest. Just tailor it well, but with the cost of a vest you could have already paid for a chunk of an invisilab and a towel which is far more versatile.


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Wed Oct 24, 2018 9:01 pm
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Post Re: Cold paws
bluesky2012 wrote:
Wchauvin wrote:
My dogs vest keeps her wayyyyyy warmer than without it. She also gets dried off and sits behind full cover, but that vest definitely keeps them warm. Like ol boy said above, when you stick your hand in that vest, it's warm


Show me a study or something that isolated the variables and tells me which is most effective. I have put my hand inside the vest, and found it no different than the dogs coat when dry. Everyone always speaks to these issues purely anecdotally.

From everything I’ve seen and the numerous vests I have tried, tailored, etc, drying a dog off at least as much as a vest, and costs on $7 now with the Chinese tariffs. The vast majority of vests prior to tailoring act as a water scoop anyways and arguments have been made that a standard vest, especially prior to tailoring, actually pulls more heat from the dogs body. To make neoprene even remotely effective you need precise tailoring.

The dogs DRY hair and blocking the wind is far more effective, so just bring a towel. May not be as cool for facejob or instagram pics, but it works well. I just don’t care to complicate it. Just make sure you don’t use oil removing dog shampoo during the season so the dogs hair stays oily and keeps water out of the undercoat.

If you want a dog vest, get a dog vest. Just tailor it well, but with the cost of a vest you could have already paid for a chunk of an invisilab and a towel which is far more versatile.


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I'm not disagreeing with you that drying the dog is a great idea, but you asked for a study showing vests work, so show me a study that drying the dog with a towel (which will become soaked after a couple retrieves) works. You don't need to isolate any variables to know that there are several ways to keep a dog warmer: vests, drying dog, propane heaters, maintaining body mass, etc. Neoprene is a known insulator used in cold water survival gear (where they actually did do famous military tests on human subjects). Physics tells us that insulators block heat transfer, so yes they will help the dog retain heat. Put a vest on a dog in mild temps and see how quickly they start to pant. I hunt in Minnesota in temps from 70's down to single digits where ice has to be broken. The vests definitely help.

Are vests perfect or the only solution to help prevent hypothermia? No.
Do vests help prevent hypothermia? Yes.
Are there several methods to help prevent dog hypothermia including the use of common sense? Yes.

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Post Re: Cold paws
MNGunner wrote:
bluesky2012 wrote:
Wchauvin wrote:
My dogs vest keeps her wayyyyyy warmer than without it. She also gets dried off and sits behind full cover, but that vest definitely keeps them warm. Like ol boy said above, when you stick your hand in that vest, it's warm


Show me a study or something that isolated the variables and tells me which is most effective. I have put my hand inside the vest, and found it no different than the dogs coat when dry. Everyone always speaks to these issues purely anecdotally.

From everything I’ve seen and the numerous vests I have tried, tailored, etc, drying a dog off at least as much as a vest, and costs on $7 now with the Chinese tariffs. The vast majority of vests prior to tailoring act as a water scoop anyways and arguments have been made that a standard vest, especially prior to tailoring, actually pulls more heat from the dogs body. To make neoprene even remotely effective you need precise tailoring.

The dogs DRY hair and blocking the wind is far more effective, so just bring a towel. May not be as cool for facejob or instagram pics, but it works well. I just don’t care to complicate it. Just make sure you don’t use oil removing dog shampoo during the season so the dogs hair stays oily and keeps water out of the undercoat.

If you want a dog vest, get a dog vest. Just tailor it well, but with the cost of a vest you could have already paid for a chunk of an invisilab and a towel which is far more versatile.


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I'm not disagreeing with you that drying the dog is a great idea, but you asked for a study showing vests work, so show me a study that drying the dog with a towel (which will become soaked after a couple retrieves) works. You don't need to isolate any variables to know that there are several ways to keep a dog warmer: vests, drying dog, propane heaters, maintaining body mass, etc. Neoprene is a known insulator used in cold water survival gear (where they actually did do famous military tests on human subjects). Physics tells us that insulators block heat transfer, so yes they will help the dog retain heat. Put a vest on a dog in mild temps and see how quickly they start to pant. I hunt in Minnesota in temps from 70's down to single digits where ice has to be broken. The vests definitely help.

Are vests perfect or the only solution to help prevent hypothermia? No.
Do vests help prevent hypothermia? Yes.
Are there several methods to help prevent dog hypothermia including the use of common sense? Yes.


I’m not disagreeing, all I’m saying is I don’t buy into the notion that a vest is the best way to keep a dog warm. An ill fitting one is likely to make the dog colder than without one, and a properly fitted one just isn’t worth it in my opinion in less, as I mentioned earlier, you use it to prevent chest injuries in timber. I’ve gone through a handful of vests on my dogs, now I just use a towel and have hunted single digits and ice without any issue. I just keep one vest not and only pull it out if I think my dog is at risk of injury.


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Thu Oct 25, 2018 7:08 am
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Post Re: Cold paws
When I wear a jacket, I'm warmer, regardless if it is "tailored" to fit me perfectly. The same thing applies with an animal. I personally use all the methods described here. I dry my dog off, put a jacket on her, keep a heater on her, keep a pad under her, etc. not only does all that protect your dog, but a happy dog that isn't miserable is going to give you better and more consistent retrieves, just like staying comfortable and warm results in more consistent success when hunting, imo

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Post Re: Cold paws
Wchauvin wrote:
When I wear a jacket, I'm warmer, regardless if it is "tailored" to fit me perfectly. The same thing applies with an animal. I personally use all the methods described here. I dry my dog off, put a jacket on her, keep a heater on her, keep a pad under her, etc. not only does all that protect your dog, but a happy dog that isn't miserable is going to give you better and more consistent retrieves, just like staying comfortable and warm results in more consistent success when hunting, imo


That’s a non-sequitur. Your jacket does not work the same as the neoprene vest. The neoprene is meant to fit snugly and allow only one set of water to enter between the skin and the neoprene, then body heat warms up that water, and the water stays there and keeps the dog warm. If the water is allowed to go out or in, it doesn’t work well.

This is why tailoring matters. If the dogs vest isn’t tailored around the neck and the rib cage, water flows in and out. The neck is often the biggest issue because it acts like a scoop, funneling water down the dogs body as it swims serving as a very efficient heat sink because of its specific heat. Water removes heat 25x faster than air so the fit of the vest is FAR more critical than your jacket.

Your coat doesn’t need to be tailored the same because air doesn’t pull heat from you to the same degree.


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Thu Oct 25, 2018 8:45 am
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Post Re: Cold paws
Before I got a tailored jacket for my dog, the non tailored one still kept her from shivering. That was my experience with it

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Post Re: Cold paws
Well my dog has a pretty big neck. And is shaped generally like a summer sausage. He fills up both ends of that vest pretty well. I don't think there's going to be a lot of water exchange every time he's in and out of the water. It should work pretty good.


Thu Oct 25, 2018 11:29 am
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Post Re: Cold paws
If I would have known about the stuff I would have. I've caught hell for being such a puzzy in the cold weather.

One time I drove an hour to the ramp and the temp was in the 50s. The temps were supposed to be in the upper 70's by midmorning, so I wore shorts because I didn't want to cook in my waders. Got to the ramp only to realize my lab drug them out of the boat (Probably pizzed because he realized he wasn't coming). I manned up and froze my sack off that morning.

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Post Re: Cold paws
bluesky2012 wrote:
Wchauvin wrote:
When I wear a jacket, I'm warmer, regardless if it is "tailored" to fit me perfectly. The same thing applies with an animal. I personally use all the methods described here. I dry my dog off, put a jacket on her, keep a heater on her, keep a pad under her, etc. not only does all that protect your dog, but a happy dog that isn't miserable is going to give you better and more consistent retrieves, just like staying comfortable and warm results in more consistent success when hunting, imo


That’s a non-sequitur. Your jacket does not work the same as the neoprene vest. The neoprene is meant to fit snugly and allow only one set of water to enter between the skin and the neoprene, then body heat warms up that water, and the water stays there and keeps the dog warm. If the water is allowed to go out or in, it doesn’t work well.

This is why tailoring matters. If the dogs vest isn’t tailored around the neck and the rib cage, water flows in and out. The neck is often the biggest issue because it acts like a scoop, funneling water down the dogs body as it swims serving as a very efficient heat sink because of its specific heat. Water removes heat 25x faster than air so the fit of the vest is FAR more critical than your jacket.

Your coat doesn’t need to be tailored the same because air doesn’t pull heat from you to the same degree.


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sounds like you’re bothered more by non-tailored vests than you are by having a vest at all. Which I guess I could understand.
Where do you hunt, out of curiosity?
I would think putting effort into making a vest tailored would be more efficient than drying off your dog after every retrieve.
Reason I say that is I’d get tired of drying my dog off if we’re killing 2+ limits.
Yes, I have slow Hunt’s too but usually the cold and windy ones, where I’d use a vest, are more productive days anyways


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Post Cold paws
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Post Cold paws
kirk wrote:
bluesky2012 wrote:
Wchauvin wrote:
When I wear a jacket, I'm warmer, regardless if it is "tailored" to fit me perfectly. The same thing applies with an animal. I personally use all the methods described here. I dry my dog off, put a jacket on her, keep a heater on her, keep a pad under her, etc. not only does all that protect your dog, but a happy dog that isn't miserable is going to give you better and more consistent retrieves, just like staying comfortable and warm results in more consistent success when hunting, imo


That’s a non-sequitur. Your jacket does not work the same as the neoprene vest. The neoprene is meant to fit snugly and allow only one set of water to enter between the skin and the neoprene, then body heat warms up that water, and the water stays there and keeps the dog warm. If the water is allowed to go out or in, it doesn’t work well.

This is why tailoring matters. If the dogs vest isn’t tailored around the neck and the rib cage, water flows in and out. The neck is often the biggest issue because it acts like a scoop, funneling water down the dogs body as it swims serving as a very efficient heat sink because of its specific heat. Water removes heat 25x faster than air so the fit of the vest is FAR more critical than your jacket.

Your coat doesn’t need to be tailored the same because air doesn’t pull heat from you to the same degree.


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sounds like you’re bothered more by non-tailored vests than you are by having a vest at all. Which I guess I could understand.
Where do you hunt, out of curiosity?
I would think putting effort into making a vest tailored would be more efficient than drying off your dog after every retrieve.
Reason I say that is I’d get tired of drying my dog off if we’re killing 2+ limits.
Yes, I have slow Hunt’s too but usually the cold and windy ones, where I’d use a vest, are more productive days anyways


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I now hunt West Tennessee/ Mississippi/ and that general latitude, but I used to hunt the eastern shore of Maryland, Virginia, and NE North Carolina as well as the mississippi delta. Ventured into Louisiana quite a bit as well. I’ve hunted the frozen Chesapeake bay, timber, rice fields, and big rivers all around. May not have hit up the Great Lakes yet, but also don’t care too.

And yes, you’re correct. Most vests IMO are worthless because they aren’t tailored well. Even when tailored well, I don’t think they are worth much. In terms of cost, a towel is worth the same.

On the same token, I see you’re in SW Louisiana. Fun place to hunt, but I don’t imagine the weather down there ever should slow a lab down, wet, or dry. Not trying to start some big issue here (as nearly all dog threads are) but I just don’t really care for vests and don’t think they are the most effective or cost efficient method.

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Thu Oct 25, 2018 7:40 pm
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Post Re: Cold paws
Yeah, it doesn't get super cold down here, but last year it got stupid cold for us down here. A few days it was in the teens and about a week it was in the 20s. Breaking ice was something unknown to us before this past season. After those freezing days, I ended up putting a lot more into trying to keep my pup warm and comfortable.

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Post Re: Cold paws
bluesky2012 wrote:
kirk wrote:
bluesky2012 wrote:
Wchauvin wrote:
When I wear a jacket, I'm warmer, regardless if it is "tailored" to fit me perfectly. The same thing applies with an animal. I personally use all the methods described here. I dry my dog off, put a jacket on her, keep a heater on her, keep a pad under her, etc. not only does all that protect your dog, but a happy dog that isn't miserable is going to give you better and more consistent retrieves, just like staying comfortable and warm results in more consistent success when hunting, imo


That’s a non-sequitur. Your jacket does not work the same as the neoprene vest. The neoprene is meant to fit snugly and allow only one set of water to enter between the skin and the neoprene, then body heat warms up that water, and the water stays there and keeps the dog warm. If the water is allowed to go out or in, it doesn’t work well.

This is why tailoring matters. If the dogs vest isn’t tailored around the neck and the rib cage, water flows in and out. The neck is often the biggest issue because it acts like a scoop, funneling water down the dogs body as it swims serving as a very efficient heat sink because of its specific heat. Water removes heat 25x faster than air so the fit of the vest is FAR more critical than your jacket.

Your coat doesn’t need to be tailored the same because air doesn’t pull heat from you to the same degree.


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sounds like you’re bothered more by non-tailored vests than you are by having a vest at all. Which I guess I could understand.
Where do you hunt, out of curiosity?
I would think putting effort into making a vest tailored would be more efficient than drying off your dog after every retrieve.
Reason I say that is I’d get tired of drying my dog off if we’re killing 2+ limits.
Yes, I have slow Hunt’s too but usually the cold and windy ones, where I’d use a vest, are more productive days anyways


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May not have hit up the Great Lakes yet, but also don’t care too.

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Well if you ever do decide to venture up here, you better come opening weekend. My waders froze to my boat last week when I was kneeling getting something out of my hatch and we're only halfway through the season. Your towel would've been as stiff as a board :)

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Fri Oct 26, 2018 8:02 am
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Post Re: Cold paws
That's cold af lol

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Fri Oct 26, 2018 12:23 pm
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Post Re: Cold paws
So his double XL showed up. It was still a struggle to put on. Took me and my wife to get it on. One to pull it together and the other to zip it. Will it stretch out?

Also he is not too thrilled to be wearing it. Maybe because it's a little too tight.


Sat Oct 27, 2018 5:50 pm
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Post Re: Cold paws
I have used the mushers on my labs the stuff works incredible . I also use it in last winter hiking the Adirondack mountains in cold temps

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Sat Oct 27, 2018 7:25 pm
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Post Re: Cold paws
He should get used to it in time bro

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Sun Oct 28, 2018 6:47 am
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Post Re: Cold paws
Wchauvin wrote:
He should get used to it in time bro


I made him wear it around the house for a bit yesterday. He did seem to get a little more used to it for sure. But it is more difficult to put on than then I expected. The second time I was able to do it myself. I think maybe the material just needed to stretch around his summer sausage-like belly.


Sun Oct 28, 2018 6:55 am
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Post Re: Cold paws
It was hard to get it on my pup at first and now she knows if i put it on her we are going hunting, so she is well behaved and happy when I pull it out and let her wear it. In time, your pup will attribute it to something positive and it will be easier to put on him/her

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Post Re: Cold paws
JBsuperG wrote:
Wchauvin wrote:
He should get used to it in time bro


I made him wear it around the house for a bit yesterday. He did seem to get a little more used to it for sure. But it is more difficult to put on than then I expected. The second time I was able to do it myself. I think maybe the material just needed to stretch around his summer sausage-like belly.


Put it on and then walk outside and throw yard marks. Give it a few sessions and he will associate it with fun. Same thing for a new dog blind, e-collar, etc.

If your dog is seriously hesitant, a lock winged pigeon to play with while wearing the vest will definitely change its tone.


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Sun Oct 28, 2018 6:24 pm
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